Fret Saw .021" Kerf Fret Slot Cleaning Tool Our Price: 13.25

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StewMac Fret Slot Cleaning Tool Luthier Tools Guitar Repair VGC Fret Work | Musical Instruments & Gear, Guitars & Basses, Guitar Builder/Luthier Supply | eBay!

Fret Slot Cleaning Saws Ryoba 0.40 mm

$21.00
  • Review
  • TAG : a small hook tool that nicely scrapes the slot clean.
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  • Cleaning your fret slots is an important step of refretting any guitar. The fret slots must be clean in order to accept the new frets. Before you use your fret slot cleaning tool, you will need to take out your fret slot saw and saw or scrape away the hardened glue that is left over inside the fret slot. For more information about fret slot saws, please see my fret slot saw article. The fret slot saw will leave sawdust and debris inside the fret slot. This is where the fret slot-cleaning tool works well.

    Cleaning your fret slots is an important step of refretting any guitar. The fret slots must be clean in order to accept the new frets. Before you use your fret slot cleaning tool, you will need to take out your fret slot saw and saw or scrape away the hardened glue that is left over inside the fret slot. For more information about fret slot saws, please see my fret slot saw article. The fret slot saw will leave sawdust and debris inside the fret slot. This is where the fret slot-cleaning tool works well.

  • The fret slot cleaning tools is basically a curved x-acto knife. You can use it to scrape out all of the remaining glue bit and sawdust left over from the fret slot saw. You may not think that this is really that useful of a tool. I mean why can you just blow the dust out of the slot? Well, you never want to blow any dust off your fretboard when you are working on the frets or fret slots. The reason for this is because you may have chipped the fretboard while you were pulling the frets out of it. The small chips may still be lying on the fretboard. You don't want to blow those away. Instead, you want to keep them and glue them back into place when you are ready to glue your fret back on. The fret slot-cleaning tool allows you to clean out the fret slot with out potentially losing small pieces of the fretboard. Here are some inexpensive fret slot cleaning tools that luthiers use.

    The fret slot cleaning tools is basically a curved x-acto knife. You can use it to scrape out all of the remaining glue bit and sawdust left over from the fret slot saw. You may not think that this is really that useful of a tool. I mean why can you just blow the dust out of the slot? Well, you never want to blow any dust off your fretboard when you are working on the frets or fret slots. The reason for this is because you may have chipped the fretboard while you were pulling the frets out of it. The small chips may still be lying on the fretboard. You don't want to blow those away. Instead, you want to keep them and glue them back into place when you are ready to glue your fret back on. The fret slot-cleaning tool allows you to clean out the fret slot with out potentially losing small pieces of the fretboard. Here are some inexpensive fret slot cleaning tools that luthiers use.



  • There was a load of glue and grunge under these frets. With scrapers, wipers and heat from an alcohol lamp, it’s amazing how much gunk Dan Erlewine extracted from Mike Bloomfield’s old fretboard!

    This is the 1963 Tele that Mike Bloomfield used to record iconic guitar solos with Bob Dylan and the Paul Butterfield Blues Band in 1965.

    If you have questions, please contact us through our webpage or visit our Facebook page

    For more information on tools and parts:

    Fret Slot Cleaning Tool


    De-Glue Goo


    Refret Saw


    Fret Slot Depth Gauge


    Dan Erlewine's Fret Basics DVD


    Fret Rocker

Tools, Jigs, & Machinery | Austin Guitar Repair

On the Blake A-4, I bought a pre-slotted blank, cut it to shape, bound it, and installed all but 2 of the dots. Then I fitted the 5th fret dot and the 15th fret dot but did not glue them in. I drilled a tiny hole through the cavities for those dots so I could pin the board in exact position. I pinned the board to the neck and made final adjustments to the fit, tacked the board to a really flat piece of 1 inch hardwood with liquid hide glue, cleaned the slots, and fretted it. Then I removed the board from the hardwood, double checked the fit, masked it top and bottom, lacquered the binding, removed the masking, and glued it to the neck with hot hide glue and a really flat clamping caul, pinning it in place through the holes I had drilled earlier. 48 hours later I removed the clamps and pins, installed the remaining dots, set the nut and strung it. In that order from start to finish. I only had to spot level a couple of frets, and got the board within a couple of thousandths of perfect position with very little disruption to the mandolin.

Not the quickest way to do it, but it worked really well. Stew-Mac's little fret slot cleaning tool is a handy device, but you have to be careful with it. Their fret tang nippers are indispensable.

Instead of working by formula, I look at each job individually. Sometimes I alter my approach depending on the materials on hand, or because of any irregularities in the instrument. I like to prefit and tack fingerboards and bridges; and I always go through at least one dry run of clamping without glue. Saves a lot of trouble from things sliding out of position when you glue and clamp them.